28
Jul
Salonee Gadgil

So… has the pandemic set us back or propelled us forward?

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Last week, just days after the restrictions in England were lifted, we hosted our first panel event. The discussion brought together great minds: Chartered Psychologist Dr Jennifer Opoku-Lageyre who spoke about her experiences treating patients with trauma and anxiety during the pandemic, Andy Ratcliffe, Executive Director of Programmes at Impact on Urban Health, who shed light on what it was like supporting communities in South London during the pandemic and Maccs Pescatore, CEO, Montessori Centre International who shared her views on how lockdowns have impacted Britain’s early years education. The conversation was chaired by Sarah O’Grady, Social Affairs Correspondent at the Daily Express and our Managing Director Laura Oliphant.

It was rich discussion, one that was supposed to last 45 mins, but lingered on for much longer and continued over a few glasses of wine. Our insightful speakers and engaged audience had much to talk about. The discussion swung between being quite pessimistic about the damage done by the pandemic, and optimistic about it being the catalyst we needed to bring about social change. We asked those in attendance what they’d remember most about things that were discussed. What’s the one idea or insight they’d take with them? Here’s what they said they’d be most likely thinking about on the train ride home.

The fact that there is a difference in 12 years of life expectancy within Lambeth borough.  

 We often talk about the great divide between the haves and have-nots in London. But Andy really hammered the message home with this very shocking statistic. It reinforces the need for tailored messaging around things like the vaccine. Can we really be reaching these two very disparate groups of people, one in Dulwich, another on Queen’s Road Peckham using the same public service messages asking them to go take the vaccine? Are we surprised they don’t all behave the same way?

We haven’t seen the economic second wave yet.

 A lot of Andy’s work at Impact on Urban Health is around how life hits health, that is, how housing, jobs and income affect ones physical health. So far, we’ve had the job retention scheme, we’ve had benefits, and suspended evictions. People working in the sector worry that when all these support systems are taken away, there will be a new wave of illnesses from people who can’t eat or live as well, or look after their children because of economic pressures. People have been talking about ‘long covid’, but what Andy’s been worried about is the ‘long pandemic’.

The desire to make decisions begins very young and is fundamental to our development.

Maccs reminded us of just how important early years education is, in developing decision-making skills. When a child goes into a Montessori nursery, they learn to make their own choices about what they want to play with, draw, and so on. This ability to make choices, autonomously, is vital in building a sense of self and resilience. Dr Jen pointed out that over the course of the pandemic, rules have been made for us. This loss of autonomy has been the fundamental cause for why people have experienced poor mental health. Humans strive for autonomy and personal freedom. If adults are suffering from the lack of the freedom to choose, what impact has living under strict guidelines had on small children? Should we really be more worried about the loss of their maths ability during the pandemic, when the real issue may be an ingrained lack of autonomy?

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13
Jul
Beth Davies

Appealing to Gen Z – what makes a strong brand in 2020?

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For a long time, the attention of brands and communications professionals has been directed towards understanding millennials. This exciting generation was seen to be shaping the future of digital and ushering in a new age of Airbnb-ing and Uber-ing. But just as people started getting their heads around what it meant to be a millennial, and how to reach them, millennials grew up.

Now in their late-20s and 30s, millennials’ tastes, habits and values are changing, and for many brands, a key market is now a younger and perhaps trickier audience – my generation – Gen Z.

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30
Nov
Anthony Di Natale

Disrupting the banking market

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I was walking through my hometown in Peterborough last week when I stumbled across a brand-new Metro Bank outlet. It’s a pretty impressive building, and as the Bank’s 50th branch, it celebrated with a two-day grand opening party.

Despite Metro Bank’s self-proclamation as the ‘revolution in British banking’, I noticed most passersby staring in bewilderment. It was clear that most people had never seen or heard of Metro Bank before.

When it opened in 2010, Metro Bank was the first new high street bank to launch in over 150 years. It was viewed as a legitimate ‘challenger’ to the Big Four (HSBC, Barclays, Lloyds, RBS), offering branches open seven days a week, walk-in appointments and straightforward products. Different, yes. ‘Revolutionary’, not so sure.

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21
Oct
Grace French

Disruptor brands – an industry challenge or an opportunity?

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Recently an article by Ian Griggs in PR Week caught my eye. It was about challenger brands being considered the biggest potential ‘crises’ in the eyes of established players. I, and several of those quoted in the article, thought it was a bit strong to label market disruption a crisis. Jim Hawker’s comments resonated the strongest with me, saying that “the best way to respond is to innovate today rather than scramble to respond tomorrow”.

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