21
Apr
Eryl Bradley

Lessons from lambing

Posted by Eryl BradleyTagged , , ,

From the time the pandemic hit, I’ve spent even more time than usual back with my family in west Wales. Most notably, this has meant helping out on my aunt and uncles’ 350-acre farm during lambing season. While being a great conversation starter, farming also undoubtedly gives you a new perspective on office life. Here’s three key things I’ve taken away.

It’s PR, not ER

Comms – and specifically, PR – is consistently voted one of the most stressful sectors to work in. With immediate decisions needed almost every hour, and with most journalists expecting everything yesterday, agency life can be extremely high pressure.

When you’re lambing, in some ways, the stress is similar. The constant re-prioritisation of which lamb or ewe is more in need of help is exhausting, and keeping a mental map of where every animal is and who’s been fed is no easy task. This can feel similar to juggling client needs and knowing what member of the team is working on what, when. But the fact that lambing is also a very physical job – without designated office hours – means you tire physically as well as mentally, and frequently have to get up in the middle of the night to do it all again.

As well as this, what you’re doing day-to-day is often the difference between life and death. If you forget to give a vulnerable lamb a bottle, even once, that can be the end. And that’s on you. When you go from dealing with decisions that can alter the life course of an animal, it reminds you to have perspective on that sell in that didn’t go so well, or the harsh client feedback that could have once ruined your day. As a wise colleague once reminded me – it’s public relations, not the emergency room.

 

Read more “Lessons from lambing”

09
Feb
Eryl Bradley

Believe in Better: Insight and inspiration from industry leaders

Posted by Eryl BradleyTagged , , , ,

According to a recent report by the thinktank, Ember, the UK’s renewable electricity outpaced its fossil fuel generation for the first time in 2020 and could remain the largest source of electricity in the future. It’s big news for the sector because although renewable energy has overtaken fossil fuels during the summer months before, 2020 was the first time that renewables were the main source of the UK’s electricity over a year.

As a business that contributes to the transition to a green energy system, our client Zenobe Energy, a leading owner and operator of battery storage, is very much part of this change. Its unique offering helps bring renewable energy onto the grid and is accelerating the rollout of electric buses and fleets across the UK.

For the fifth episode in our Believe in Better series, we spoke to Steven Meersman, Zenobe Energy’s co-founder, about why battery storage is important in the transition to renewable energy, what the UK needs to do to transition to a green energy system in 2021 and beyond, and what ‘better’ looks like for the industry.

Watch this space for future episodes of Believe in Better with more inspiring thought leaders from our network.

Check out our previous episodes, which include:

Justine Lago, Director and Executive Coach of Onion HR

Matt Griffiths, CEO of Youth Music

Leonor Stjepic, CEO of Montessori Group

Steve Swayne, Chair of the Institute for Turnaround

To learn more about Stand Agency, work with or collaborate with us, please email ask@standagency.com. Follow us on Twitter @standsays

21
Dec
Eryl Bradley

The future of communications: insight, strategy and results

Posted by Eryl BradleyTagged , , , , , ,

Anyone who knows us well will know that Stand’s work is built on insight, strategy and results: these are the three pillars of our success.

Think of them as the before, during and after of a campaign or project.

Before we begin working with a client, we like to understand them, and what their audience needs and expects from them. This is so we can ensure nothing we say falls on deaf ears, and our work is always grounded in knowledge of the sector.

During any communications work we carry out, we are guided by an end goal. This is some sort of tangible outcome which helps define exactly what success looks like; this could be trying to redefine how we view life post-retirement or educating the public about the signs of a rare heart condition. Everything we do is based on an airtight strategy that works to get clients where they want to be.

And, as a result of these two things, we like to think we get results that matter – whether that’s one in-depth piece of coverage in the right publication, or a social media campaign that reached 50 of the right people. It’s been reassuring to see more clients interested in these tangible and meaningful results, and less wowed by vanity metrics; a trend we hope continues.

In a year where just getting through is something we all deserve a pat on the back for, we’ve had some interesting and exciting projects that show how, in the world of communications, some things will never be the same post-Covid. Here’s a few examples relating to a client I’ve worked on this year, the Grounds Management Association.

Read more “The future of communications: insight, strategy and results”